Steppy Had A Talk with Designer of Japanese Brand Kuon
We had the honor to speak with the two designers in “BEYOND”, and since Element is now carrying the brand, so we decide to have a deeper look at it.

Today I’m going to share a Japanese blue dye brand with all of you. We had the honor to speak with the two designers in “BEYOND”, and since Element is now carrying the brand, so we decide to have a deeper look at it.

 


Also, KUON is one of the winners of The Fashion Prize of Tokyo 2018.

 


After we talked with the designers, we found out they intentionally designed the Look Book. They wished to break the limitations of traditional elements by doing so, because most people have the impression that traditional clothes with sashiko stiching are hard to pull off. They wanted to break this impression by adding a streetwear sense into the Look Book.

 


Boro is the most important element for KUON. Boro, also known as “old clothes”, are clothes using textiles that have been mended or patched together. Cotton products were rare 150 years ago in Japan, so they would make full use of one clothes by sawing and fixing it.


When asked about the most difficult part using boros to make clothes, the designer answered in “BEYOND”:



“The most difficult thing is the patching process. Like our stitching jacket, each part of the pattern is hand-stitched on the boro. In addition to the sashiko stiching, the persimmon leaf pattern is more prominent because the Japanese love these natural elements since long ago. Mud-dyes are difficult as well. The most tiring part of this process is soaking and rinsing. Some clothes will be rinsed 30 times, some even 60 times. You can’t even finish it in a day."

 

We also picked several KUON special crafted products. The Sashiko stitching was developed during Edo period. It was difficult to obtain cotton in some very cold areas, so people stitched thin cotton cloth together to keep warm in order to survive in the freezing winter. Sashiko has now evolved into a decorative stitching and embroidery, creating a lot of original pattern designs.

 


The weaving technique is also famous. Sakiori weaving is a Japanese traditional weaving technique. It interweaves fabrics with recycled, weft-knitted, and worn out clothes together to create a new fabric. I have to mention that the Sakiori in KUON are all made by disabled people. It reflects the brand concept to “solve social problems through fashion business activities.”


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Steppy Had A Talk with Designer of Japanese Brand Kuon
We had the honor to speak with the two designers in “BEYOND”, and since Element is now carrying the brand, so we decide to have a deeper look at it.

Today I’m going to share a Japanese blue dye brand with all of you. We had the honor to speak with the two designers in “BEYOND”, and since Element is now carrying the brand, so we decide to have a deeper look at it.

 


Also, KUON is one of the winners of The Fashion Prize of Tokyo 2018.

 


After we talked with the designers, we found out they intentionally designed the Look Book. They wished to break the limitations of traditional elements by doing so, because most people have the impression that traditional clothes with sashiko stiching are hard to pull off. They wanted to break this impression by adding a streetwear sense into the Look Book.

 


Boro is the most important element for KUON. Boro, also known as “old clothes”, are clothes using textiles that have been mended or patched together. Cotton products were rare 150 years ago in Japan, so they would make full use of one clothes by sawing and fixing it.


When asked about the most difficult part using boros to make clothes, the designer answered in “BEYOND”:



“The most difficult thing is the patching process. Like our stitching jacket, each part of the pattern is hand-stitched on the boro. In addition to the sashiko stiching, the persimmon leaf pattern is more prominent because the Japanese love these natural elements since long ago. Mud-dyes are difficult as well. The most tiring part of this process is soaking and rinsing. Some clothes will be rinsed 30 times, some even 60 times. You can’t even finish it in a day."

 

We also picked several KUON special crafted products. The Sashiko stitching was developed during Edo period. It was difficult to obtain cotton in some very cold areas, so people stitched thin cotton cloth together to keep warm in order to survive in the freezing winter. Sashiko has now evolved into a decorative stitching and embroidery, creating a lot of original pattern designs.

 


The weaving technique is also famous. Sakiori weaving is a Japanese traditional weaving technique. It interweaves fabrics with recycled, weft-knitted, and worn out clothes together to create a new fabric. I have to mention that the Sakiori in KUON are all made by disabled people. It reflects the brand concept to “solve social problems through fashion business activities.”


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